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Source of All Geothermal Energy

Hello again,

It is important to remember that the sun is the source of all geothermal energy. NASA has some spectacular videos that give you a feel for the power of our sun! Try this video on for size (careful, it can be mesmerising). According to the leader on the video, this 15 minute video required about 150 hours of special technicians’ time to prepare. It is made from ten different wavelength exposures, each shown in different colours here, taken every 10 seconds.

P.S. If you get a white box with or without advertising in the middle of the screen, you can cancel it, Mouse-over the upper right corner area – when you see a small black circle with an “x” in it, click on it. That should close all the garbage and give you an unrestricted view. It is even more spectacular full screen!

Ground Heat Pumps

Ground-Heat-Pumps

Geothermal Heat Pump – a green and cost effective technology

The word geothermal originates from two Greek words ageoa which mean earth and athermea which heat. Therefore it is a renewable source of energy emanating from the ground. A Geothermal heat pump works on the principal that in winters, it moves the heat from the earth into the home whilst in summers the apparatus discharges the heat of your home into the ground. Heat flows from higher temperatures substances to lower temperature substances and the earth traps as much as half the energy of the sun received by it. A ground source heat pump utilizes this energy stored in the earth or water bodies to provide heating. Ground source heat pumps use the earth as a source of energy in winters and as a heat sink in summers. A geothermal heat pump transfers the heat from the water to the air and thus it functions as an air conditioner.

As it relies on renewable source of energy a geothermal heat pump or ground source heat pump is much for efficient in heating and cooling the spaces and water than an electric heater is. This enables you to cut utilities bills by as much as 70%.

Using the relatively constant temperature of the ground several feet below the earth’s surface for heating and cooling, geothermal heat pumps are appropriate both for retrofit and new houses. A large number of geothermal companies and geothermal pump contractors are there and you can easily get a geothermal heap pump installed in your home.

The basic components of a ground source heat pump include a loop field, a liquid pump pack and a water source heat pump. The loop field can be placed on your home, enabling it to discharge heat into the ground or move the earth’s heat into your home. The size of the loop depends upon the size of the building. The liquid pump pack is used to send the water whilst the water source heat pump is more like a boiler.

About the author: Geothermal heat pumps are used both for residential and commercial purposes and therefore there are three types of ground source heat pumps available. Fore more info please visit here – http://www.mygreencomfort.com

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/electronics-articles/geothermal-heat-pump-a-green-and-cost-effective-technology-877387.html


Heat Pump

Is A Heat Pump Right For Your Home?

Comfort is a big consideration in any household. It makes the house a more comfortable place to live in. It makes a house a home. This is also a reason why you must take proper considerations of the necessary changes that can be implemented in the house, changes that will improve the present conditions.

One of the questions that most household dwell on is whether or not to install a heat system in the house. Of course, the comfort and safety of the family must always be the priority. Of course, deciding on the heat system also entails certain consequences that the household must prepare for.

The heating system, as the name implies, ensures the comfort of the family when the weather gets too cold. Of course, most heating systems, when not properly installed or cared for will end up as a liability. That is why one must pick the right heating system to support the needs of the family.

Is a Heat Pump the Right System for Your Home?

The heat pump system depends on the magic of obtaining heat from the cold air and processing it to be supplied to the house. This mechanism makes use of the heat pump appliance that operates on a refrigeration technology. With this at hand, instant warmth and cooling can be easily secured.

Many households have benefited and attested to the goodness entailed by installing heat pumps. There are many ways to make heat pumps an ideal companion during the cold climate.

1. Good Alternative

The heat pump is a good tool for places where electrical heat system is the only option. Not every location can get a good source of natural gas to support the traditional conditioning system. This may dispense with the electrical system. Of course, it all depends on the environment.

2. Save Energy and Save Money

The heat pump is also a bestseller for its energy saving attributes. The installation procedure may take some expenses. Of course, after the installation stage, the rest comes easily.

A heat pump will produce twice amount of heat with just the same amount of energy that an ordinary and less expensive electric heating system will provide. Thus, it necessarily follows that one get to save more money in the process.

3. Consider the Condition of the House

The heat pump can also work best in a household constructed with the proper insulation. There are also energy-efficient elements that can be built in the house.

These aspects shall ensure that with just one heat pump the whole house can enjoy the warmth. These can also facilitate the heat pump to work efficiently at all times, no matter how much the weather outdoor will change or drop.

4. Size and Installation

The right heat pump must be properly chosen according to its size, whether it is to serve a cooling or heating purpose. Ascertain these aspects upon installation.

5. Length of Use

There are heat pumps ideal only for short term utilization. Some can withstand lengthy usage. In general, an air-source heat pump is not to be used over long periods and below zero temperatures. Thus, this should be considered properly with the location of the house and demands of the family members.

6. Ground Source Heat Pumps

Ground source heat pumps or GSHPs are the more effective kind. They may require more expenses for installation. Of course, they become beneficial in the long run. They can last long. They can also help the household save more money.

7. Sound Levels

Most people are discouraged of heat pumps because of the noise aspect. There is, however, an alternative to get rid of this problem.

Choose the right heat pump by buying the ones that have sound levels of, at the most, 7. 6 bels. This indicates the noise level of the outdoor pump. It is better to find sound ratings lower than 7. 6 bels.

About the author: For more great heat pump related articles and resources check out http://topheatpumps.info

Source: http://www.isnare.com/?aid=73905&ca=Home+Management


Heat Pumps

Ground Source (also Called Geothermal) Heat Pumps: Heat And Cool Your Home Without Gas Or Oil

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs), often called geothermal heat pumps, tap into the heat naturally generated many meters below the surface of the earth. Just a little ways down, the earth’s temperature is warm and relatively stable, so these systems can bring controllable and effective heating, cooling, and hot water to residential and commercial buildings. Best of all, they allow people to do all this without having to use expensive and carbon-producing fossil fuels such as oil and gas.

There are two types of ground source heat pump systems: those with closed loops and those with open loops. In closed loop systems, liquid (usually with some sort of antifreezing/antiboiling agent mixed in) circulates through pipes buried beneath the earth’s surface. During the winter, when the goal is warming a house, the fluid absorbs heat from the earth and carries back to the building. This very hot liquid can be effectively used to heat a home, and also quite obviously becomes a free-flowing source of useable hot water. During the summer, the system is designed to actually draw heat out of the building, and either use it to heat water for household use or deliver it back into the ground. Open looped systems are similar, except that the water supply within the pipes is continually refreshed.

The bulk of geothermal (GSHP) systems are the pipes that are buried far underground, so what is needed in your home is a unit likely no bigger than your current hot water heater and furnace. If you currently use oil, you may be able to get rid of or at least substantially downsize the size of your oil tank. Many people worry about the longevity and upkeep costs of this type of system because the bulk of the cost goes into burying the pipe underground. Recently however many companies have been offering 40-75 year warranties on the parts of the system that is buried.

If you already have a forced air oil or gas-fed furnace system it may be easy for you to convert to what is called a “dual system”. In this case you would choose which heating and cooling system would be primary at any particular time – most likely the geothermal system – and the other system will only work when needed, such as during an extremely cold spell in the winter.

GSHPs are quiet and safe. There are no exposed parts, fans, storage tanks, etc. that can hurt kids or pets. Nothing is burned so there is no flame. The heating source is the earth so there is nothing to wear out. They are also quiet because the earth is doing the work of the motors in your current furnace.

The initial cost for ground source heat pumps is greater than that of a conventional oil or gas system. However, that initial cost is often made up in three to six years depending on the cost of fuel and the temperature in your area. The greatest benefit of these systems is that you no longer have to use oil or gas at all, so not only are you not subject to the price fluctuations and uncertainty of these fuels, but you also reduce your own “carbon footprint” in the process.

Ground source systems are easy to install, particularly when they are replacing another forced-air system. In this case it is as simple as a retrofit after the pipes are placed. However, they can also be installed to completely replace the system you already have. If you don’t already have central air conditioning, that can be an automatic and immediate benefit of these systems. Contact an experienced installer and he or she can tell you exactly what would be involved in installing a geothermal heat pump in your home.

About the author: For more information about ground source and geothermal heat pumps, please see http://www.groundsourceheatpumps.info and http://www.geothermalheatpumps.info.

Source: http://www.isnare.com/?aid=203417&ca=Home+Management


Geothermal Pump

Geothermal Heat Pump – a green and cost effective technology

The word geothermal originates from two Greek words ageoa which mean earth and athermea which heat. Therefore it is a renewable source of energy emanating from the ground. A Geothermal heat pump works on the principal that in winters, it moves the heat from the earth into the home whilst in summers the apparatus discharges the heat of your home into the ground. Heat flows from higher temperatures substances to lower temperature substances and the earth traps as much as half the energy of the sun received by it. A ground source heat pump utilizes this energy stored in the earth or water bodies to provide heating. Ground source heat pumps use the earth as a source of energy in winters and as a heat sink in summers. A geothermal heat pump transfers the heat from the water to the air and thus it functions as an air conditioner.

As it relies on renewable source of energy a geothermal heat pump or ground source heat pump is much for efficient in heating and cooling the spaces and water than an electric heater is. This enables you to cut utilities bills by as much as 70%.

Using the relatively constant temperature of the ground several feet below the earth’s surface for heating and cooling, geothermal heat pumps are appropriate both for retrofit and new houses. A large number of geothermal companies and geothermal pump contractors are there and you can easily get a geothermal heap pump installed in your home.

The basic components of a ground source heat pump include a loop field, a liquid pump pack and a water source heat pump. The loop field can be placed on your home, enabling it to discharge heat into the ground or move the earth’s heat into your home. The size of the loop depends upon the size of the building. The liquid pump pack is used to send the water whilst the water source heat pump is more like a boiler.

About the author: Geothermal heat pumps are used both for residential and commercial purposes and therefore there are three types of ground source heat pumps available. Fore more info please visit here – http://www.mygreencomfort.com

Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/electronics-articles/geothermal-heat-pump-a-green-and-cost-effective-technology-877387.html


Geothermal

Google’s  Million Investment in Geothermal Indicates the Green ...

Ground Source (also Called Geothermal) Heat Pumps: Heat And Cool Your Home Without Gas Or Oil

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs), often called geothermal heat pumps, tap into the heat naturally generated many meters below the surface of the earth. Just a little ways down, the earth’s temperature is warm and relatively stable, so these systems can bring controllable and effective heating, cooling, and hot water to residential and commercial buildings. Best of all, they allow people to do all this without having to use expensive and carbon-producing fossil fuels such as oil and gas.

There are two types of ground source heat pump systems: those with closed loops and those with open loops. In closed loop systems, liquid (usually with some sort of antifreezing/antiboiling agent mixed in) circulates through pipes buried beneath the earth’s surface. During the winter, when the goal is warming a house, the fluid absorbs heat from the earth and carries back to the building. This very hot liquid can be effectively used to heat a home, and also quite obviously becomes a free-flowing source of useable hot water. During the summer, the system is designed to actually draw heat out of the building, and either use it to heat water for household use or deliver it back into the ground. Open looped systems are similar, except that the water supply within the pipes is continually refreshed.

The bulk of geothermal (GSHP) systems are the pipes that are buried far underground, so what is needed in your home is a unit likely no bigger than your current hot water heater and furnace. If you currently use oil, you may be able to get rid of or at least substantially downsize the size of your oil tank. Many people worry about the longevity and upkeep costs of this type of system because the bulk of the cost goes into burying the pipe underground. Recently however many companies have been offering 40-75 year warranties on the parts of the system that is buried.

If you already have a forced air oil or gas-fed furnace system it may be easy for you to convert to what is called a “dual system”. In this case you would choose which heating and cooling system would be primary at any particular time – most likely the geothermal system – and the other system will only work when needed, such as during an extremely cold spell in the winter.

GSHPs are quiet and safe. There are no exposed parts, fans, storage tanks, etc. that can hurt kids or pets. Nothing is burned so there is no flame. The heating source is the earth so there is nothing to wear out. They are also quiet because the earth is doing the work of the motors in your current furnace.

The initial cost for ground source heat pumps is greater than that of a conventional oil or gas system. However, that initial cost is often made up in three to six years depending on the cost of fuel and the temperature in your area. The greatest benefit of these systems is that you no longer have to use oil or gas at all, so not only are you not subject to the price fluctuations and uncertainty of these fuels, but you also reduce your own “carbon footprint” in the process.

Ground source systems are easy to install, particularly when they are replacing another forced-air system. In this case it is as simple as a retrofit after the pipes are placed. However, they can also be installed to completely replace the system you already have. If you don’t already have central air conditioning, that can be an automatic and immediate benefit of these systems. Contact an experienced installer and he or she can tell you exactly what would be involved in installing a geothermal heat pump in your home.

About the author: For more information about ground source and geothermal heat pumps, please see http://www.groundsourceheatpumps.info and http://www.geothermalheatpumps.info.

Source: http://www.isnare.com/?aid=203417&ca=Home+Management


Heat Pump System

Benefits of a Geothermal Heat Pump system

Benefits of a Geothermal Heat Pump system

Free or Reduced-Cost Hot Water

Unlike any other heating and cooling system, a geothermal heat pump can provide free hot water. A device called a “desuperheater” transfers excess heat from the heat pump’s compressor to the hot water tank. In the summer, hot water is provided free; in the winter, water heating costs are cut roughly in half.

Year-Round Comfort

While producing lower heating bills, geothermal heat pumps are quieter than conventional systems and improve humidity control. These features help explain why customer surveys regularly show high levels of user satisfaction, usually well over 90 percent.

Design Features

Geothermal heat pump systems allow for design flexibility and can be installed in both new and retrofit situations. Because the hardware requires less space than that needed by conventional HVAC systems, the equipment rooms can be greatly scaled down in size, freeing space for productive use.

And, geothermal heat pump systems usually use the existing ductwork in the building and provide simultaneous heating and cooling without the need for a four-pipe system.

Improved Aesthetics

Architects and building owners like the design flexibility offered by GHPs. Historic buildings like the Oklahoma State Capital and some Williamsburg structures use GHPs because they are easy to use in retrofit situations and easy to conceal, as they don’t require cooling towers.